Posts tagged - libraries

NLM Theater Presentations

The NLM Theater puts on a series of 20 min sessions on a variety of topics. All of the sessions are put on at least twice throughout the conference and some are put on three times. At each of the sessions they had a raffle for a prize. I couldn’t make it to all of the sessions, but I went to as many as I could and will provide a brief summary of the ones I made it to. Here is a list of their sessions.

 

Using ClinicalTrials.gov to Find Research Results Not Available Elsewhere
Rebecca Williams gave the presentation on clinicaltrials.gov. Clinical Trials has over 165,000 registered clinical trials and observational studies with over 12,000 of those available on the website. This collection consists of both private and federal studies at all stages. Studies are registered at the beginning, updated when no new participants are being allowed in, when the study is complete, and when results are available. Each record is made of two sections. The first is the registration section which includes the protocol of the trial and recruitment information. The second section is the results section where the results are displayed on a table. Not all studies will include their results.
Where do these studies come from?
Researchers submit their information when they start their trials. It is important to point out that publishing results in this collection will not interfere with publication in journals as long as the results are published with the registration record. In fact, most medical journals require registration of all clinical trials, and some are mandated by federal law.
What can you do with clinicaltrials.gov?
  • Find potential trials for you or your patrons to participate in. It could be a place for you to refer patrons who are looking for different treatment alternatives.
  • Track progress of trials.
  • See what kind of trials are going on.
  • Find investigators and centers that are doing research on a particular disease.
When you search clinical trials you can use the advance search option to limit your results in a variety of ways including only studies accepting patients or only those with results.
If you want more information or want to learn more, you can email register@clinicaltrials.gov. Your local NNLM also provides classes.

Modernizing History: The New (and much improved) IndexCat interface
This session was about the new IndexCat. Stephen Greenberg told us that there are 3.7 million citations XML downloadable. The new IndexCat is fast! It also has a new record display and format. The collection is made up of five series based mostly on the age of the material. Series 1-3 are complete while series 4&5 are still incomplete.
Stephen gave us an overview of how to search the new interface. The searching is full-text keyword, there is no controlled vocabulary. Some exciting upgrades to the IndexCat searching include Boolean functions, phrase searching, and truncation searching. One thing they are still working on are journal titles. Journal titles would change and often the journal editor would be cited rather than the journal title. This makes for an ugly situation but they are working on ways to make searching for journals in IndexCat easier.

Still Scanning After All These Years: New Digital Projects from HMD
Stephen gave the presentation on new digital projects from the NLM History of Medicine Department (HMD). He started his talk by admitting that the search engine of the Medical Heritage Library is not the best, but it is being upgraded. As for the scanning, that it’s good. They use a Kirtas scanner. These scanners are pretty cool and can turn book pages on its own (check out some videos online, they are fun to watch), plus they have a cold light source so they are safe for the materials. HMD turn the pages by hand since many of their books are fragile and they don’t want to risk damaging the books. The scanner produces a tiff file which is then uploaded as a PDF.
Many people assume that the fragility of the materials would be the major issue, but in reality the main concern is copyright. If the NLM has a document you need that isn’t online they will scan on demand for DOCLINE requests. These requests usually only take about a week. One thing to note is that the entire book will be scanned and sent to you as a PDF even if only a chapter or a few pages were requested.
Due to the complexity of journal metadata, journals haven’t been scanned. This is changing very soon! Some journal scanning will be starting by the first week of June. They are also doing incunabula.

NLM Resources Used In Disasters
Elizabeth Norton, Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, and Maria Collins presented on using the NLM in disaster situations.

We all know that librarianship is a service oriented career. The Stafford Act federally recognized this by making libraries eligible for federal assistance for temporary facilities in case of a disaster.
The NLM Disaster Information Specialist Program provides “support for librarians providing disaster information outreach to their communities.” In the case of a disaster there are roles librarians can take. These include:
  • Aggregate information
  • Develop FAQs
  • Develop helpful apps
  • Act as call centers and charging stations
  • Monitor social media
  • Authenticate news and information
Next, Mary talked about the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) which was started after the Katrina disaster. Many major publishers provide resources for free to be used after a disaster. In order for the Initiative to be turned “on” at least 5 health sciences libraries in the area need to lose access to biomedical literature for at least two weeks. If these conditions are met then there is free access for four weeks with a possible renewal. An example is NYU which actually was not able to take advantage of this resource due to it’s local support. These materials are not open access, they are only for those impacted by the disaster. To date the EAI had been turned “on” five times:
  • Haiti 2010 earthquake
  • Pakistan 2010
  • Haiti 2010 cholera
  • Japan 2011
  • Philippians 2013

After all these occurrences the data was analyzed. It was seen that book literature was used more than journals. The most popular books were drug books and trauma books depending on the event. In the case of Japan radiation books were added. Data is analyzed after each event.

PubMed Update
Marie Collins gave us the update on PubMed. Some stats include: 23.7 records, 5667 journals, and mobile searches have increased to 430,000.
One problem that was talked about is that of disambiguating authors. One solution to this is adding affiliation information for all authors rather than just the lead author. You may not notice this at first since it is a collapsed option. You can easily open them up to find the information. You can also change a setting in MyNCBI to make the default not be collapsed. Another solution to the author problem is the unique author identifier which comes from the publisher. There is a new field to search this identifier. Finally, there is a “computed author” search. If you click on an authors name in an abstract you will get articles written by that same author.
Other upgrades:

  • The history function has been updated with the query now showing keywords rather than the search #.
  • You can now also delete individual searches from the history.
  • Recent activity is stored for six months and can be searched, sorted, and added to collections.
There are interface changes too:
  • Relevance sort!
    • The algorithm is available in Help for anyone to see
  • Cited by systematic reviews
    • In the right hand of results of results display
    • Links to resources that cite a study
  • LinkOut to PubMed Health
  • Schema:all
    • This “rescues zero results searches” by doing a modify search of all terms in all fields
    • Results in two searches showing up on the search history
  • Old Medline can be searched in two ways
    • Oldmedline[sb] searches the subset of 400,000
    • Jsubsetom searches entire two million
  • New catalog filter for journals currently indexed in Medline
  • PMCID-PMID-manuscript ID-DOI converter is available on the homepage

If you need any assistance the PubMed help desk is very helpful. Also keep your eye open for PubMed training classes.

PubMed Health
Hilda Bastian gave this presentation on PubMed Health. PubMed Health provides help with finding systematic reviews and help with understanding them. The PubMed Health collection consists of systematic reviews, knowledge translation, and education materials. Systematic reviews have a few basics that qualify them as systematic reviews:

  • Ask structured, pre-specified question
  • Have systematic methods
  • Methods aim to minimize bias
  • May or may not have quantitative synthesis / meta-analysis
The resources in PubMed Health come from a variety of places including DARE, Cochrane, and health technology assessment (HTA) agencies.

 

RDA One Year Later
Cataloging is not my area of expertise, so I am just going to provide some key points I got out of this presentation:
  • There were no catastrophic problems!
  • RDA is principle based rather than format based
  • RDA makes a true representation of an item
  • There was lots and lots of prep for implementation
    • Daily upload from LC authority files updated
  • Vocabulary changes were necessary for RDA
  • Guidelines are available in the RDA Toolkit

———

I really wish I had been able to attend all of the events, the NLM definitely puts on some great sessions.

No Comments

NLM Update

The NLM update was started off by the director of the NLM, Dr. Donald A. B. Lindberg. It has been a good year for NLM and MLA! We watched a Look Back- Move Forward video talking about what has been done at the NLM and the future holds. A side note from Dr Lindberg is his belief that patients need to be a full partner in their health.
We next learned about the Native Voices exhibition at the NLM which has been shared with native populations and will soon be available as a traveling exhibition. If you don’t know about the NLM traveling exhibition program check it out here.
Next we heard about the NLM bioinformatics course. The next classes will be September 14-20, 2014 and April 12-18, 2015. There is a new location for these classes in Brasstown Resort in Georgia. Two other events were also mentioned: The Health DataPalooza in DC June 1-3, 2014 and the Joseph Leiter Lecture held in Bethesda June 12, 2014.

The topic of data challenges was brought up with examples of genomic testing with food borne illnesses and community health assessments. We were reminded that the NLM provides supplements to research grants and this may be something some of us would want to look into. Some videos from the NYU health sciences library were mentioned as a good source of information. Check out their YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/nyuhsl.

Joyce Backus was the next speaker and she started off with resource sharing. As mentioned in the DOCLINE users group blog post, DOCLINE requests have declined but we know that DOCLINE is still vital. See the blog post for more information. The statistic that MedlinePlus has increased in mobile use (26% to 40%) was also mentioned in the DOCLINE users group meeting. Joyce went into more detail talking about usability tests that showed that the mobile site was not meeting the demand. Due to this, the whole website is being updated to be a responsive design site. For those that don’t know, a responsive design site is one that adjusts to the size of different screens. So it is one site that works on desktops, tablets, phones, and laptops. The NLM is performing this upgrade on a variety of site including AIDSinfo, and PubReader already does this.

One of the last bits of the NLM update was a call for help. There is a Request For Information (RFI) on FedBizOpps.gov to get feedback and suggestions on the NNLM/RML. We were also reminded about the NLM’s outreach in the form of the traveling exhibitions, digital collections, and the new Circulating Now website.

We were given an update on staff including multiple new staff members and the Fellows. There is one individual retiring – Angela Ruffin. The session ended with Dixie Jones have Dr. Lindberg a framed resolution with a very long list of his many accomplishments.
Keep in touch with the NLM through email, and find them on twitter, and facebook!

All slides will be posted online after the conference.

No Comments

Reminder: Sign Up By Monday for Chicago Library Tours!

The organizers of the MLA ’14 meeting in Chicago invite you to join one of three library tours that have been organized for MLA participants. Details for each tour are given.

PLEASE SIGN UP BY Monday, May 12th.

Tour of Galter Health Sciences Library, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University
May 17th 1:00-2:00 PM
303 E. Chicago Avenue
http://www.galter.northwestern.edu/

Meet at the Galter Health Sciences Library, 303 E. Chicago Avenue. Transportation is not provided. Cab fare is approximately $10 from downtown. Public transportation options can be found at:
http://www.northwestern.edu/uservices/transportation/commuter/public-transit.html
Please note, Galter Health Sciences Library is located on the CHICAGO campus.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Please sign up by sending an email to bkern@uchicago.edu with the subject line “MLA TOUR – GALTER” (please note space is limited).

Tour of the Newberry Library
May 17th 10:30 AM
60 West Walton Street
http://www.newberry.org/

“A world-renowned independent research library in Chicago, the Newberry offers readers an extensive non-circulating collection of rare books, maps, music, manuscripts, and other printed material spanning six centuries.”
http://www.newberry.org/about

Meet at the Newberry Library, 60 West Walton Street. Transportation is not provided. Cab fare is approximately $10 from downtown.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Please sign up by sending an email to bkern@uchicago.edu with the subject line “MLA TOUR – NEWBERRY” (please note space is limited).

Tour of the University of Chicago Library
May 15th 1:00-4:30 PM
1100 East 57th Street

The tour includes the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library (including a demonstration of the automatic book retrieval system), the University of Chicago Library Preservation Department, the Imaging/Imagining the Human Body in Anatomical Representation Exhibit in Special Collections Research Center and the John Crerar Library.

[Thanks to Barbara Kern for providing this information!]

1 Comment

Sign Up for One of These Chicago Library Tours!

The organizers of the MLA ’14 meeting in Chicago invite you to join one of three library tours that have been organized for MLA participants. Details for each tour are given.

Tour of Galter Health Sciences Library, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University
May 17th 1:00-2:00 PM
303 E. Chicago Avenue
http://www.galter.northwestern.edu/

Meet at the Galter Health Sciences Library, 303 E. Chicago Avenue. Transportation is not provided. Cab fare is approximately $10 from downtown. Public transportation options can be found at:
http://www.northwestern.edu/uservices/transportation/commuter/public-transit.html
Please note, Galter Health Sciences Library is located on the CHICAGO campus.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Please sign up by sending an email to bkern@uchicago.edu with the subject line “MLA TOUR – GALTER” (please note space is limited).

Tour of the Newberry Library
May 17th 10:30 AM
60 West Walton Street
http://www.newberry.org/

“A world-renowned independent research library in Chicago, the Newberry offers readers an extensive non-circulating collection of rare books, maps, music, manuscripts, and other printed material spanning six centuries.” http://www.newberry.org/about

Meet at the Newberry Library, 60 West Walton Street. Transportation is not provided. Cab fare is approximately $10 from downtown.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Please sign up by sending an email to bkern@uchicago.edu with the subject line “MLA TOUR – NEWBERRY” (please note space is limited).

Tour of the University of Chicago Library
May 15th 1:00-4:30 PM
1100 East 57th Street

The tour includes the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library (including a demonstration of the automatic book retrieval system), the University of Chicago Library Preservation Department, the Imaging/Imagining the Human Body in Anatomical Representation Exhibit in Special Collections Research Center and the John Crerar Library.

Joe and Rika Mansueto Library
http://mansueto.lib.uchicago.edu/
Imaging/Imagining the Human Body in Anatomical Representation Exhibit in Special Collections Research Center
http://news.lib.uchicago.edu/blog/2014/03/11/imagingimagining-the-human-body-in-anatomical-representation/
John Crerar Library
http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/about.html
Meet at the Joseph Regenstein Library, 1100 East 57th Street. Transportation is not provided. Cab fare is approximately $25.00 from downtown. Public transportation options can be found at: https://maps.uchicago.edu/directions/masstransit.shtml

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Please sign up by sending an email to bkern@uchicago.edu with the subject line “MLA TOUR – UCHICAGO” (please note space is limited).

[Thanks to Andrea Twiss-Brooks for providing this post!]

No Comments

Guest Blog Post by Ramune Kubilius

I’m happy to have a number of guest blogs in the coming weeks and months as we move closer to MLA 2014. My first guest poster is Ramune Kubilius of Northwestern University Galter Health Sciences Library with a “What’s New” blog. Thanks Ramune! 

What’s new in Chicago since the last time the MLA conference was in town?

by Ramune K. Kubilius (Northwestern University, Galter Health Sciences Library)

Chicago area MLA members are pleased to again welcome the annual MLA conference to Chicago. The last annual meeting of the Medical Library Association held in Chicago was the 108th, convened May 16-21, 2008. The meeting theme was “Connections: Bridging the Gaps.” Total attendance was 2,436. See: J Med Libr Assoc. 2009 January; 97(1): E1–E41. [PMC2605030]

So, what is new since MLA conference goers last visited Chicago? As mentioned in the 2014 annual meeting blog, http://npc.mlanet.org/mla14/, Chicago has a new public transit card, VENTRA, the Chicago Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup in 2013, and there are many new and improved sites to see. Chicago has long been known for its architecture. This is a sampling of a few newer buildings, structures, and additions that certainly make an impression to anyone interested in Chicago’s architectural scene. Information snippets about them were gleaned primarily from their websites. All of these gems are located in Chicago, primarily in the vicinity of the conference hotel. Note: Visits to some of these sites may require advance or special arrangements.

 

BUILDINGS
McCormick Place’s rooftop garden
Location: 2301 South Lake Shore Drive
https://www.facebook.com/mccormickplace

Although 2014 MLA annual meeting attendees won’t be gathering at McCormick Place, the large Chicago convention center, located south of the city’s Museum campus, has a new claim to fame. Launched in June 2013, McCormick Place’s brand new rooftop garden is said to be the largest rooftop garden in the entire Midwest. (At 20,000 square feet, it’s expected to yield 4,000 pounds of produce this year, and more in years to come). The garden’s crew comes from VRIC (the Cook County Sheriff’s Vocational Rehabilitation Impact Center, formerly known as Cook County Boot Camp) and Windy City Harvest, a training program operated by the Chicago Botanic Garden. (The director of urban agriculture at the Chicago Botanic Garden is in charge of the garden). The vegetables grown go directly downstairs from the rooftop to Savor, McCormick’s catering company. McCormick Place prides itself on these facts: the garden is an experiment in sustainability, with no middle man, no carbon emissions from shipping or delivering, and it also helps cool the building below. (No information has been found that this garden is open to the public).

 

Trump International Hotel and Tower
(also known as Trump Tower Chicago and Trump Tower)
Location: 401 N Wabash Ave

http://www.trumphotelcollection.com/chicago/

When topped out in 2009, the Trump Tower became the second-tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, after the Willis Tower (formerly known as the Sears Tower). Trump Tower Chicago surpassed the city’s John Hancock Center as the building with the highest residence (apartment or condo) in the world, and held this title until the completion of the Burj Khalifa in November 2012. Now, the twelfth-tallest building in the world, the building design includes, from the ground up, retail space, a parking garage, a hotel, and condominiums. The 339-room hotel opened for business with limited accommodations and services the year that MLA was in town, on January 30, 2008 and construction was completed in 2008. The building received publicity when the winner of the first season of The Apprentice reality television show, Bill Rancic, chose to manage the construction of the tower in his native Chicago.

 

Willis Tower
Location: 233 South Wacker Drive
http://www.willistower.com/

There have been several developments related to this building. Named the Sears Tower throughout its history, in 2009 the Willis Group obtained the right to rename the building, as part of their lease on a portion of its offices and on July 16, 2009, the building was officially renamed Willis Tower. More recently, in November 2013,the Willis Tower was knocked off its perch on the lists as the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat decreed that the needle on top of the new World Trade Center in New York counts in the calculation of the building’s height, which pushed the Willis Tower out of the top spot. But, do not despair, a trip to Willis Tower and “The Ledge” is still worth a visit. The Sears Tower observation deck, called the Skydeck, opened on June 22, 1974 but more recently, the new addition, TheLedge, opened to the public on July 2, 2009. It is a glass balcony experience offering a view, two boxes extending four feet outside the 103rd floor of Willis and able to bear five short tons of weight (about 4.5 metric tons).

MUSEUMS AND LIBRARIES

Art Institute’s Modern Wing
Location: 111 South Michigan Avenue
http://www.artic.edu/

Founded 1879, The Art Instituteof Chicago, with its signature lion statues out front, has been a popular tourist destination for many years. On May 16, 2009, a new wing was opened, designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architect Renzo Piano. The Modern Wing is the new home for the museum’s collection of 20th and 21st-century art. This 264,000 square-foot building makes the Art Institute the second-largest art museum in the United States. The Nichols Bridgeway connects the Modern Wing’s third level to the southwest corner of Millenium Park’s Pritzker Great Lawn. It should also be noted that the Art Institute’s  galleries of European modern art have been closed for renovation and will reopen just before the MLA annual meeting, in April 2014.

 

Joe and Rika Mansueto Library – University of Chicago
Location: 1100 East 57th Street
http://www.mansueto.lib.uchicago.edu/
see also: http://www.uchicago.edu/features/20110520_mansueto/

In May 2011, University of Chicago opened the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library, a structure that includes a domed area for research and study, a preservation laboratory, and beneath the new library’s main floor, a basement five stories deep that can hold 3.5 million books, periodicals and other items. When any of items are requested, they are retrieved by a computer-linked mechanical retrieval system. While other institutions may have opted for remote and offsite storage solutions for older or lesser used materials, the University of Chicago went a different route. What some call a “futuristic” Helmut Jahn designed structure, the Mansueto Library is connected by a bridge pathway to, and rises up from the lawn west of the Regenstein Library that was built in 1970. ( John Crerar Library, the science library, is down the street at 5730 South Ellis). Look for announcements about possible organized tours of the facility during the course of the MLA annual meeting. Otherwise, access for visiting users must be arranged through the ID & Privileges Office (773-702-8782) at Regenstein during office hours

 
National Hellenic Museum
Location: 333 South Halsted Street
http://www.nationalhellenicmuseum.org/

As medical historians know, medicine has roots in ancient Greece. The National Hellenic Museum, until 2009 known as the Hellenic Museum and Cultural Center, moved to its present spacious facility in 2011. The building houses not only exhibit floors, but also a gift shop, a library, and an oral history center. Chicago has one of the world’s largest Greek populations and the museum is the first and only major museum in the country dedicated to the Greek journey, from ancient times to the modern Greek American experience.

Pritzker Military Library 
Location: 104 South Michigan Avenue
http://www.pritzkermilitarylibrary.org/

In its new building across the street from Millennium Park and the Art Institute of Chicago since early 2011, the Pritzker Military Library is open to the public with speakers, live events and a collection of books, films, and gallery exhibits. All tell the story of the Citizen Soldier in American military history. The library is open to the public, though only members can check out books. It was founded in 2003 by Colonel Jennifer Pritzker IL ARNG (Ret.), (then known as James Pritzker), a military veteran and military history buff, as well as a member of the philanthropic and well-known Chicago-based Pritzker family.  As the library’s website describes, “The library’s holdings swelled from about 9,000 books originally — mostly the Pritzker family’s private collection — to more than 50,000 books, artifacts and videos.”  The library occupies three floors of a restored Holabird and Roche building. One of its named collections is the James Wengert Military Medical Collection.

 

HOSPITAL

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
Location: 225 East Chicago Avenue
http://www.luriechildrens.org/

A name change from Children’s Memorial Hospital occurred when the respected pediatrics hospital moved in June 2012 from Lincoln Park to its current location in the Streeterville neighborhood. The new address positions the hospital closer to Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and the school’s other affiliated hospitals- Northwestern Memorial Hospital, with its nearby Prentice Women’s Hospital, as well as Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (currently undergoing its own building project). The hospital is built vertically and the public spaces and corridors feature sculptures, a portion of a fire engine as a play area for children, and several corners that have covered balconies where long-term patients can take a breath of fresh (city) air. Located in the hospital are a small library for clinical staff and a consumer education library for patients and their families. Note that the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago Research Center Halsted facility and its Pritzker Research Library remain in the Lincoln Park neighborhood.

NOT QUITE COMPLETED YET

Another visit to Chicago may be warranted…
 
More coming to McCormick Place
https://www.facebook.com/mccormickplace

In August 2013, Mayor Emanuel and city officials broke ground on the Cermak-McCormick Place CTA Green Line “L” stop. Expected to open by the end of 2014, this new train stop will feature a fully-covered platform, LED lighting and located just two blocks from the campus. In September 2013, the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority announced the selection of internationally-renowned architecture firm Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects to design a 10,000-seat event center at McCormick Place, scheduled for completion in the fall of 2016, that will host general sessions for large conventions and trade shows and DePaul University basketball. A new hotel, the Marriott Marquis, to be connected by a bridge to the West Building of McCormick Place, is scheduled for completion in late 2016.

Maggie Daley Garden
http://maggiedaleyparkconstruction.org/

Chicagoans are looking forward to the opening of Maggie Daley Park, named in honor of Chicago’s beloved first lady who died of metastatic breast cancer in November 2011. Construction began October 2012, phase two began a year later, and the Garden is slated to open in 2015. Originally called the North Grant Park renovation project, the plan is to reinvigorate the 20 acres of land, three discrete landscapes along the northern edge of Grant Park. It will transform the sites of Daley Bicentennial Plaza into a single continuous public landscape that will operate at a variety of scales, serve a growing residential community, and join Millennium Park.

No Comments